Courses

FALL 2018

German 10a. Beginning German

An introduction to German language and culture designed for students with little or no knowledge of the language. Encompasses all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Class sessions emphasize the development of oral proficiency. Instruction is supplemented by literary and non-literary texts, videos, and Internet activities. The first half of this course may not be taken as a half course for credit toward the AB degree; there are no exceptions to this rule. May not be taken Pass/Fail. Not open to auditors. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) in order to receive credit

Staff

M-Th 9:00am, 9:00am, 10:30am, or 12:00pm

German 10ab. Beginning German (Intensive)

A complete first-year course in one term for students with no knowledge of German. Provides an introduction to German language and culture encompassing all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as an introduction to the culture of the German-speaking countries. Class sessions emphasize the development of oral proficiency. Instruction is supplemented by literary and non-literary texts, videos, and Internet activities

Staff

M-F
9:00am-10:00am      (plus F 10:00am-11:00am)

German 20a. Intermediate German: Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading, and Writing

Using an interactive discussion format, this third-semester language course offers systematic vocabulary-building and a grammar review. The focus is on improving comprehension and speaking skills. Materials include short fiction and drama, poetry, contemporary film, interactive lab work, and cultural materials from German websites.

Staff

M-Th 9:00am-10:00am

German20ab. Intermediate German (Intensive): Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading, and Writing

A complete second-year course in one term for students with a basic knowledge of German. Focuses on enhancing students' proficiency in all four skill areas with special emphasis on speaking/discussion. Extensive vocabulary-building exercises, a thorough grammar review, and an introduction to various cultural topics of the German-speaking countries through the use of literary and non-literary texts, Internet, multimedia resources, and film.

Staff

M-F
9:00am-10:15am (plus F 10:15am-11:15am)

German Ax. German for Reading Knowledge

Development of reading proficiency for students with little or no knowledge of German. Emphasizes translation of academic German prose into English.

Schwakopf

 

M, W 3:00pm-4:15pm

German 61. Advanced Grammar and Reading

Close reading, analysis, and full production of a play in German. Prerequisite to true fluency in German. Advanced language instruction through systematic study of the rules of grammar, their nuances, and their exceptions. Application of this knowledge through the meticulous reading and parsing of selections from sophisticated texts (Goethe, Kant, Kleist), as well as an entire Nietzsche essay and Thomas Mann story, prepares students for courses and any work requiring advanced German reading comprehension.

Burgard

T, Th 9:00am-10:15am

T, Th 10:30am-11:45am

German 65. German Drama and Theater

Close reading, analysis, and full production of a play in German. The first part provides an introduction to a small selection of dramas, dramatic theory, the vocabulary of theater, as well as intensive pronunciation practice. The second part focuses on the rehearsal and production of a German play. Students participate on stage and collaborate on different aspects of the production, including costumes, set, sound, and program. Two performances take place at the end of term. Conducted in German.

Parkes T, Th 1:30pm-2:45pm

German 101. German Literature, Culture, and Society

This course examines the major social-political trends and tensions that have informed literature and culture in the German-speaking countries. Students will develop the language skills to discuss, analyze, and interpret a variety of texts and cultural phenomena from the 18th to the 21st centuries, with special attention to social theory and political critique. Our readings and discussions are organized around pairs of thinkers from literary Realism and filmic representations to recent political editorials. We will put thinkers in dialogue with one another who address the same issues from a different time, angle, or place. Further emphasis is placed on the history of ideas and how it contributes to current issues and debates. Readings range from Goethe and Hegel through Benjamin and Brecht, Kafka and Jelinek, Arendt and Adorno.  Readings and discussion in German.

Schwakopf M, W 10:30am-11:45am

German 120. Age of Goethe

Major movements in German literature and thought from the mid-18th to early 19th century: Enlightenment, Sentimentalism, Storm and Stress, Classicism, Romanticism. Readings include Kant, Klopstock, Lessing, Goethe, Lenz, Schiller, Hölderlin, Kleist, Schlegel, Novalis.

Burgard

T
12:00pm-2:45pm

German 139. Understanding Wagner's Ring

This course brings together Wagner’s music and the political philosophy that informs it. Wagner’s monumental tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen (1876), a complex allegory of power and redemption, has long been recognized as an intensely political work, whose stagings often focus on the politics articulated in the opera, whether it is socialism, totalitarianism, or environmental destruction. (Musical literacy is helpful but not required.)

Rehding

M    12:00pm-2:45pm

German 140. German Social Thought, Nietzsche to Habermas

A philosophical and historical survey of major debates in modern German social theory over the span of a century, from Nietzsche's anti-foundationalist critique of morality and truth to Habermas's attempt to rebuild a pragmatic-transcendentalist theory for ethical and discursive reason after the collapse of metaphysics. Readings by Nietzsche, Weber, Heidegger, Adorno, Horkheimer, and Habermas.

Gordon T, Th 10:30am-11:45am

German 147. Nietzsche

Readings and discussion of Nietzsche's major works in translation and in chronological order: The Birth of Tragedy; On Truth and Lie in an Extra-Moral Sense; Untimely Meditations; Human, All Too Human; The Gay Science; Thus Spoke Zarathustra; Beyond Good and Evil; On the Genealogy of Morals; Twilight of the Idols; The Antichrist; and Ecce Homo.

Burgard W   12:00pm- 2:15pm

German 151. Kafka in Context

Close readings of Kafka's novels and stories, with some attention to a selection from his diaries and letters. Attempts to situate Kafka's works in relation to the cultural context in which they originated. Some attention also to Kafka's impact on later writers; students may explore this aspect in their final papers.  No knowledge of German required. Readings and discussions in English; German concentrators read and discuss the works in the original.

Ryan T, Th 12:00pm-1:15pm

German 200. Introduction to Middle High German

This graduate course introduces MHG as a language. Grammar and historical linguistics get covered through work material. Readings include verse epics by Wolfram von Eschenbach, and the final paper needs to engage with one or several of Wolfram’s works.   Open to graduate students from other departments who wish to learn to read medieval and early modern German for research.

Kirakosian

M      3:00pm-5:45pm

German 291. Questions of Theory

The seminar is built around a sequence of fundamental questions regarding the literary disciplines, their history and epistemology. Discussions are instigated by readings in philology, stylistics, the history of ideas, semiotics, structuralism, psychoanalysis, post-structuralism, film theory, genetic criticism, literary sociology, cultural studies, and digital humanities.

Hamilton/Schnapp

 

F      9:45am- 11:45am

German 300. Special Reading Programs and Research Problems for Advanced Students.

TBA

TBA

Germanic Philology 280. Approaches to Foreign Language Teaching

A practical and theoretical introduction to foreign language instruction. Emphasis on historical and current theories of second language acquisition and their implications for the methods of teaching foreign language, culture, and literature.

Parkes F    12:00pm-2:45pm

Scandinavian 90r.a Danish

Individualized study of Danish at the elementary, intermediate and advanced levels. Contact hours with language coach. Emphasis on literacy.

TBA TBA

Scandinavian 90r.b Finnish

Individualized study of Finnish at the elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels. Contact hours with a language coach. Emphasis on literacy.

TBA

TBA

Scandinavian 90r.c Norwegian

Individualized study of Norwegian at the elementary, intermediate and advanced levels. Contact hours with language coach. Emphasis on literacy.

TBA

TBA

Scandinavian 300. Special Reading Programs and Research Problems for Advanced Students.

Mitchell

TBA

Swedish 10a. Beginning Swedish Language and Literature

A basic course focusing on listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. During fall term, pronunciation and listening comprehension will be emphasized, as well as regular writing assignments. Literary, film, music and other cultural texts will be introduced relatively early on. By semester's end, students will have achieved a basic literacy in everyday Swedish.

Broomé

TBA

Swedish 20a. Intermediate Swedish: Childhood in Swedish Literature and Culture

Sweden and Swedish Finland have produced some of the most translated and beloved works of children's fiction in the world. In this intermediate Swedish language course, we will review the essentials of Swedish grammar and vocabulary as we explore some of these classic works of children's fiction, film, and comic books and the aspects of Swedish culture they illuminate. The final project for this class involves producing your own work of children's fiction or film.

Broomé

 

TBA

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPRING 2018

German 10b. Beginning German

An introduction to German language and culture designed for students with little or no knowledge of the language. Encompasses all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Class sessions emphasize the development of oral proficiency. Instruction is supplemented by literary and non-literary texts, videos, and Internet activities. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

Staff

M-Th     9:00am, 9:00am, 10:30am, or 12:00pm

German 10ab. Beginning German (Intensive)

A complete first-year course in one term for students with no knowledge of German. Provides an introduction to German language and culture encompassing all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as an introduction to the culture of the German-speaking countries. Class sessions emphasize the development of oral proficiency. Instruction is supplemented by literary and non-literary texts, videos, and Internet activities

Staff

M-F
9:00am-10:00am (plus F 10:00am-11:00am)

German 20b. Intermediate German: Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading, and Writing

Continuation of German 20a. Discussion materials include literary and non-literary texts and film. Emphasis on speaking proficiency and on strengthening writing skills. Course includes a review of selected grammatical structures and exercises in vocabulary building.

Staff

M-Th 9:00am-10:15am, or 10:30am-11:45am

German20ab. Intermediate German (Intensive): Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading, and Writing

A complete second-year course in one term for students with a basic knowledge of German. Focuses on enhancing students' proficiency in all four skill areas with special emphasis on speaking/discussion. Extensive vocabulary-building exercises, a thorough grammar review, and an introduction to various cultural topics of the German-speaking countries through the use of literary and non-literary texts, Internet, multimedia resources, and film.

Staff

M-F
9:00am-10:15am (plus F 10:15am-11:15am)

German 63. Germany and Europe: Heimat, Exile, Return

This course discusses 20th and 21st Century German culture and poetics in dialogue and dispute with its European neighbors. Particular emphasis will be put on the effect of history on contemporary political, cultural and historical issues. How did the rest of Europe react to the German unification? How does Germany relate to its „Gastarbeiter“ today? This course is designed to provide students with the ability to gain insights into how personal and collective identity is constructed and problematized through art and culture. In this interdisciplinary course we will work with a variety of written genre (poetry, short stories, plays, essays, journalistic non-fiction), as well as visual art, architecture, and film. We will take a cultural studies approach to understanding how to read effectively and interpret textual and visual materials. Conducted in German.

Schwakopf

 

W    10:30am-11:45am

German 102. German Literature, Art and Thought

This course explores the major trends and tensions that have informed German literature, art and thought from the 18th to the 21st centuries. In addition to developing the language skills to discuss, analyze and interpret literature, students will explore the rich cultural tradition in the German-speaking countries and its continued relevance for the world.  Topics include: Enlightenment; Dark Romanticism or the German Gothic; decadence; media revolution 1900; Third Reich; GDR surveillance; Cold War; German reunification; remembering the Holocaust/ memory politics; rise of right-wing populism (AfD); ecological revolution. Figures include: Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Wagner, Nietzsche, Freud, Einstein, Brecht, Celan, Dürrenmatt, Wolf, Draesner, Horn.  Readings and discussions in German.

Suetterlin

M, F 1:30pm-2:45pm

German 164. Shaping National Identity: Cultural Trauma in Germany and the U.S.

Explores how the catastrophic events of World War II, persecution, and segregation have shaped the identity of present-day Germany and the U.S., respectively. The course focuses on the so-called “ethical turn in memory culture,” a recent global shift in remembrance strategies that initiated an unprecedented emphasis on commemorating the victims rather than the heroes of war, violence, and injustice. Post-1989 Germany proved a leader in this shift, though its controversial “memory politics” (Erinnerungspolitik) has faced increasing criticism from right-wing movements in recent years. Do we find a similar dynamic in the way the U.S. addresses its own traumatic past? What are the strategies by which a cultural identity has been reconstituted in post-Holocaust Germany and in post-segregation America? What challenges lie still ahead of us in this ongoing process of reconstitution and reconciliation? The goal of this course is to examine how the new memory ethics actively shapes the way in which Germans and Americans construct their identity today. To this end we investigate discussions of the Holocaust, slavery and segregation in German and American literature, film, art, journalism, and philosophy. Reading materials include Christa Wolf, Günter Grass, W.G. Sebald, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Hannah Arendt, Judith Butler, Bryan Stevenson.  Readings and discussions in English. Original German texts available upon request. Open to Graduate Students with permission of instructor.

Suetterlin F      9:45am-11:45am

German 174. Realism, Fantasy, and the Grotesque: Hoffmann and Balzac

A close reading of select works by E.T.A. Hoffmann and his reception in the work of Balzac focuses on Realism's indebtedness to the imaginative realms of the fantastic and the grotesque. Topics: music and inspiration; societal decadence and caricature; magic and the uncanny; experience, observation and expression.

This course is equivalent to Comparative Literature 174. Credit may be earned for German 174 or Comp. Lit. 174, but not both.

Hamilton Th  12:00pm-2:45pm

German 207. Digital Medieval Mary Magdalene: Paleography and Text-Editing

The goal of this course is two-fold: in terms of research results, we will work on an interactive online edition of a medieval Mary Magdalene legend transmitted in the Lower Rhine area; in terms of teaching practice, it will train graduate and undergraduate students in paleography, editing, and coding. Source material includes Medieval Latin, Middle Dutch, and other medieval Germanic dialects.

Kirakosian

T      9:00am-11:45pm

German 262. Adorno's Aesthetic Theory: Seminar

This graduate-level interdisciplinary seminar will address the philosophical, historical, sociological, and aesthetic questions raised by the Frankfurt School social theorist and philosopher Theodor W. Adorno in his posthumously-published masterpiece Aesthetic Theory (1970). Our chief task will be to come to a better understanding of this notoriously difficult work by examining its place in past and present debates over the relationship between art and society.  Topics include: the possibility of poetry after Auschwitz, the debate with Walter Benjamin over the status of the “aura”, the problem of artistic political engagement, and the dialectic between the culture-industry and “autonomous art.”

This course is equivalent to German 262. Credit may be earned for History 2326 or German 262, but not both.

Gordon W     3:00pm-5:45pm

German 267. Dichten und Denken: Heidegger and the Poets

The seminar reads Heidegger's poetological essays both in relation to his larger philosophical project and against the poets he studies: Hölderlin, Mörike, Trakl, and Rilke. Topics include: the nature or essence of poetic discourse; the tension between philosophy and poetry; phenomenology and philosophical hermeneutics; surface reading and depth; the poetics of etymology; and other related themes. Readings in German, with discussion in English.

Hamilton F    12:00pm- 2:45pm

Germanic Studies 172. The Heroic Epic in Northern Europe

Examines the principal heroic monuments of northern Europe, including Beowulf, Waltharius, The Lay of Hildebrand, The Lay of the Nibelungs, The Saga of the Volsungs, and the Sigurd poetry of the Poetic edda, and their interpretations  Considers the relationship of epic poetry to tradition,orality, and writing, to populations, to proto-nationalism, to cultural institutions, to the Otherworld, and to the shaping of an heroic ideal.

Mitchell TBA

German 300. Special Reading Programs and Research Problems for Advanced Students.

TBA TBA

Scandinavian 55. One Hundred Years of Scandinavian Cinema

This course explores Scandinavian cinema from the pioneers of the silent era to the globally successful hit films of the present day. Students will trace the development of Scandinavian cinema through the films of directors such as Viktor Sjöström, Carl Th. Dreyer, Lars von Trier, Ingmar Bergman and Lukas Moodysson and discover the profound influence the region’s films have had, and continue to have, on filmmaking in America and the world.  Conducted in English.

Broomé TBA

Scandinavian 90r.a Danish

Individualized study of Danish at the elementary, intermediate and advanced levels. Contact hours with language coach. Emphasis on literacy.

TBA TBA

Scandinavian 90r.b Finnish

Individualized study of Finnish at the elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels. Contact hours with a language coach. Emphasis on literacy.

TBA

TBA

Scandinavian 90r.c Norwegian

Individualized study of Norwegian at the elementary, intermediate and advanced levels. Contact hours with language coach. Emphasis on literacy.

TBA TBA
Scandinavian 300. Special Reading Programs and Research Problems for Advanced Students. Mitchell TBA

Swedish 10b. Beginning Swedish Language and Literature

Continuation of the basic course focusing on a basic mastery of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. During spring term, the emphasis is on more advanced conversation and an exploration of Sweden's culture and civilization through selected texts and video. By semester's end, students will be able to carry on conversations in everyday Swedish, read news articles, and write letters and produce substantial creative work.

Broomé TBA

Swedish 20b. Intermediate Swedish

Continuation of Swedish 20a. Focuses on enhancing students' proficiency in all four skill areas with special emphasis on speaking/discussion and the control of different discourse registers. Extensive vocabulary-building exercises, a thorough grammar review, and an introduction to various Swedish cultural topics and current affairs through the use of literary and non-literary texts, multimedia resources, and the news.  Conducted in Swedish. Prerequisite: Swedish 20a or equivalent.

Broomé TBA