Courses

FALL 2017

German Aa. Beginning German

An introduction to German language and culture designed for students with little or no knowledge of the language. Encompasses all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Class sessions emphasize the development of oral proficiency. Instruction is supplemented by literary and non-literary texts, videos, and Internet activities. The first half of this course may not be taken as a half course for credit toward the AB degree; there are no exceptions to this rule. May not be taken Pass/Fail. Not open to auditors. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) in order to receive credit

Staff

M-Th 9, 9, 10, or 12

German Bab. Beginning German (Intensive)

A complete first-year course in one term for students with no knowledge of German. Provides an introduction to German language and culture encompassing all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as an introduction to the culture of the German-speaking countries. Class sessions emphasize the development of oral proficiency. Instruction is supplemented by literary and non-literary texts, videos, and Internet activities

Staff

M-F 9 -10 (plus F 10 - 11

German Ca. Intermediate German: Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading, and Writing

Using an interactive discussion format, this third-semester language course offers systematic vocabulary-building and a grammar review. The focus is on improving comprehension and speaking skills. Materials include short fiction and drama, poetry, contemporary film, interactive lab work, and cultural materials from German websites.

Staff

M-Th 9 or 12

German Dab. Intermediate German (Intensive): Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading, and Writing

A complete second-year course in one term for students with a basic knowledge of German. Focuses on enhancing students' proficiency in all four skill areas with special emphasis on speaking/discussion. Extensive vocabulary-building exercises, a thorough grammar review, and an introduction to various cultural topics of the German-speaking countries through the use of literary and non-literary texts, Internet, multimedia resources, and film.

Staff

M, W, F 12 - 1 and T, Th 1 - 3

German 61. Advanced Grammar and Reading

Prerequisite to true fluency in German. Advanced language instruction through systematic study of the rules of grammar, their nuances, and their exceptions. Application of this knowledge through the meticulous reading and parsing of selections from sophisticated texts (Goethe, Kant, Kleist), as well as an entire Nietzsche essay and Thomas Mann story, prepares students for courses and any work requiring advanced German reading comprehension.

Burgard

 

T, Th 10:00-11:30

German 69. Crossing Borders in 20th and 21st Century German Culture

This course examines geographical, political and literary border-crossings within German-speaking Europe. We will explore how the notion of border crossings has been articulated in the small form, including poetry, the short story, the newspaper article, film, and visual art. Topics include literary projections of America (Kafka, Kracauer), exile communities before and during the Second World War (Zweig, Sebald), the Berlin Wall and German division (Grass, Schlöndorff, Schneider), multiculturalism in contemporary Germany, Austria, and Switzerland (Özdamar, Zaimoğlu), the current refugee crisis (Erpenbeck), and multilingual experimentation (Herta Müller, Pastior, Tawada).

Course Note: This course is conducted in German

Horakova

T, Th 1-2:30

German 101. German Literature, Culture, and Society

This course examines the major social-political trends and tensions that have informed literature and culture in the German-speaking countries. Students will develop the language skills to discuss, analyze, and interpret a variety of texts and cultural phenomena from the 18th to the 21st centuries, with special attention to social theory and political critique. Our readings and discussions are organized around pairs of thinkers from literary Realism and filmic representations to recent political editorials. We will put thinkers in dialogue with one another who address the same issues from a different time, angle, or place. Further emphasis is placed on the history of ideas and how it contributes to current issues and debates. Readings range from Goethe and Hegel through Benjamin and Brecht, Kafka and Jelinek, Arendt and Adorno.

Course Notes: Readings and discussion in German.

Horakova

M, W 10-11

German 143. German Empires, 1848-1948

This course examines the history of Germans in Europe and elsewhere, starting with the revolutions of 1848 and ending with the separation of Austria, West Germany, and East Germany following the Second World War. We will consider multiple different visions of what "Germany'' should be, what borders it should have, and who should be considered "German."

Course Notes: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Societies of the World. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past. This course is also offered through the History Department as History 1265. Credit may be earned for either History 1265 or German 143, but not both.

Johnson

M, W, F 11-12

German 145. Repression and Expression: Sexuality, Gender, and Language in Fin-de-Siècle Literature and Art

Examines German and Austrian art and literature of the Turn-of-the-Century (c. 1880-1920) with a focus on the dominant topics of sexuality, gender, and language that are articulated theoretically in the work of Nietzsche and Freud and insistently exemplified thematically and formally in both the art and literature of the age.

Course Notes: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past. Conducted entirely in English. German concentrators and Secondary Field students read the texts in German. Not open to auditors.

Burgard

W 2-4

 

German 160. Körper, Kommunikation, Medien: Literatur im 21. Jahrhundert W 1-3

In this course we explore German literature from the Wendezeit to the present. We investigate the central cultural, political and technological developments that have shaped the millennial consciousness since 1989/1990, focusing particularly on the question of how literary texts navigate the increasing tension between real and virtual worlds, or between bodies and media. Topics include: Wendeliteratur, dystopia, 9/11, terrorism, populism, immunity, body poetics, medicine/anatomy, intermediality, interculturality, virtuality, Popliteratur. We read canonical contemporary authors such as Draesner, Grünbein, Kracht, Jelinek, and Tawada. But we also read young authors whose role in contemporary literature is not as clearly defined yet. We thus take an active role in the canon-making process, discussing what incites readers and makes any particular text popular in the 21st century.

Readings and discussions in German. Open to graduate students.

Suetterlin

W 1-3

 

German 180. Bargaining with the Devil: the Faust Legend

Seduction and transgression, forbidden knowledge and the insatiable lust for learning, the limits of cognition, human will, and the problem of evil – these are the central themes that circulate through the legend of Faust, who is said to have exchanged his immortal soul for infinite wisdom and power. The seminar examines the elaboration and complication of this legend across the centuries and its formative role in the development of European literature and philosophy. In addition to studying Goethe’s masterwork, the seminar includes analyses of related works in European literature, music, and the visual arts, all with reference to shifting historical contexts and philosophical reflections.

Hamilton

 

W 3-5

 

German 207. Digital Medieval Mary Magdalene: Paleography and Text-Editing

The goal of this full year's course is two-fold: in terms of research results, it will create an interactive on-line edition of a medieval Mary Magdalene legend transmitted in the Lower Rhine area; in terms of teaching practice, it will train graduate and undergraduate students in paleography, editing, and coding.

Kirakosian

 

F 1-3

 

German 276. Colonial Theory and German Colonial Literature

Focuses on German fiction, autobiography, travel writings, essays, and films from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. German colonial fantasies, realities, and their aftermath will be examined in the light of recent postcolonial theory.

Ryan

 

W 3-5

German 291. Questions of Theory

The seminar is built around a sequence of fundamental questions regarding the literary disciplines, their history and epistemology. Discussions are instigated by readings in philology, stylistics, the history of ideas, semiotics, structuralism, psychoanalysis, post-structuralism, film theory, genetic criticism, literary sociology, cultural studies, and digital humanities.

Hamilton/Schnapp

 

F 10 - 12

German 300. Special Reading Programs and Research Problems for Advanced Students.

TBA

TBA

Germanic Philology 200. History of the German Language

In this language and historical linguistics course, the students learn how to read and understand Old High German as well as Middle High German texts by following the history of the German language. We work closely with a range of texts (poetical, religious, scientific), translating and analyzing them as well as discussing their cultural context.

Kirakosian

M 2-4

Germanic Philology 280. Approaches to Foreign Language Teaching

A practical and theoretical introduction to foreign language instruction. Emphasis on historical and current theories of second language acquisition and their implications for the methods of teaching foreign language, culture, and literature.

Parkes

W 3-5

Scandinavian 90r.a Danish

Individualized study of Danish at the elementary, intermediate and advanced levels. Contact hours with language coach. Emphasis on literacy.

TBA

TBA

Scandinavian 90r.b Finnish

Individualized study of Finnish at the elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels. Contact hours with a language coach. Emphasis on literacy.

TBA

TBA

Scandinavian 90r.c Norwegian

Individualized study of Norwegian at the elementary, intermediate and advanced levels. Contact hours with language coach. Emphasis on literacy.

TBA

TBA

Scandinavian 300. Special Reading Programs and Research Problems for Advanced Students.

Mitchell

TBA

Swedish Aa. Beginning Swedish Language and Literature

A basic course focusing on listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. During fall term, pronunciation and listening comprehension will be emphasized, as well as regular writing assignments. Literary, film, music and other cultural texts will be introduced relatively early on. By semester's end, students will have achieved a basic literacy in everyday Swedish.

Broomé

M-Th, 9-10

Swedish Ba. Intermediate Swedish: Childhood in Swedish Literature and Culture

Sweden and Swedish Finland have produced some of the most translated and beloved works of children's fiction in the world. In this intermediate Swedish language course, we will review the essentials of Swedish grammar and vocabulary as we explore some of these classic works of children's fiction, film, and comic books and the aspects of Swedish culture they illuminate. The final project for this class involves producing your own work of children's fiction or film.

Broomé

M-Th, 1-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPRING 2018

German Ab. Beginning German

An introduction to German language and culture designed for students with little or no knowledge of the language. Encompasses all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Class sessions emphasize the development of oral proficiency. Instruction is supplemented by literary and non-literary texts, videos, and Internet activities. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

Staff

M-Th 9, 9, 10, or 12

German Bab. Beginning German (Intensive)

A complete first-year course in one term for students with no knowledge of German. Provides an introduction to German language and culture encompassing all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as an introduction to the culture of the German-speaking countries. Class sessions emphasize the development of oral proficiency. Instruction is supplemented by literary and non-literary texts, videos, and Internet activities.

Staff

M, W, Th 9-10; T, F 9-11

German Cb. Intermediate German: Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading, and Writing

Continuation of German Ca. Discussion materials include literary and non-literary texts and film. Emphasis on speaking proficiency and on strengthening writing skills. Course includes a review of selected grammatical structures and exercises in vocabulary building.

Staff

M-Th at 9 or 12

German Dab. Intermediate German (Intensive): Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading, and Writing

A complete second-year course in one term for students with a basic knowledge of German. Focuses on enhancing students' proficiency in all four skill areas with special emphasis on speaking/discussion. Extensive vocabulary-building exercises, a thorough grammar review, and an introduction to various cultural topics of the German-speaking countries through the use of literary and non-literary texts, Internet, multimedia resources, and film.

Staff

M, W, F 12 -1 and T, Th 1 - 3

German 62. Advanced Conversation and Composition

This course is designed to further students' spoken and written German at the advanced level. Students will analyze and practice the stylistic and rhetorical features of various written and spoken genres. By focusing on aspects of contemporary society in the German-speaking countries, students will broaden and refine their vocabulary and idiom, become sensitized to different registers, as well as hone points of grammar.

 

Parkes

 

T, Th 11:30-1

German 141. Social Dynamics in Twentieth-Century Modernism

The course explores the relationship between experimental German modernist texts and their representations of social dynamics. Why do these texts tend to focus on madmen, criminals, fanatics, outsiders, alongside various types of intellectuals? Texts are predominantly short, but one novel and a drama are also included. Authors treated: Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal, Carl Einstein, Rilke, Kafka, Thomas Mann, Döblin, Benn, and Musil. Theorists include Freud, Bahr, Weber, Simmel, Mannheim, Broch, Canetti and others.

Readings and discussion in German.

Ryan

T, Th 1-2

German 146. The Ethics of Atheism: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud

Examines the Western secular tradition through the work of three seminal figures whose critiques of religion -- in social and political theory, philosophy, and psychoanalysis and anthropology -- are motivated by ethical concerns. Introductory readings of Kant and Feuerbach ground analysis of Marx’s, Nietzsche’s, and Freud’s ethical atheism. Students do not develop or debate formulae for behavior, but rather become critically aware of ethical considerations that underlie actions and that are negotiated vis-à-vis prevailing moral codes. Readings include (some selections and some complete works): Kant, Prefaces to Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone; Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity; Marx, Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy in General, Introduction to Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right, On the Jewish Question, Theses on Feuerbach, Communist Manifesto; Nietzsche, On Truth and Lie in the Extra-Moral Sense, The Gay Science, Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, The Antichrist; Freud, Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality, Totem and Taboo, The Future of an Illusion. The course is conducted as a large seminar with preparatory section meetings the afternoon or evening before the full seminar meeting.

 

Burgard

W 2-4

German 173. Carmen and the Art of Seduction

The seminar centers on Bizet’s Carmen, the opera that shocked 19th-century Europe for its bold expression of seduction and sexuality. Further consideration is given to historical precedents and consequences, from Mozart’s Don Giovanni to Strauss’s Salomé, including Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde and Parsifal as counter-examples of non-seduction. Discussions of literary, historical, and theoretical materials complement musical analyses and rehearsals of selected pieces, with a public performance at the end of the semester.

Open to performers and non-performers.

Course Note: German 173 is also listed as and equivalent to Comp.Lit 173 and Music 175r. Credit maybe earned for only one of these courses.

Cortese, Hamilton, and Parkes

Th 1-4

German 191. Engineering Texts: Avant-gardes in Twentieth-Century Germany

This seminar explores the intersections among art, science, and industry as they were thematized by innovative strands of twentieth-century German culture. Topics will include the fascination of artists with the machine and the artificial human being at the dawn of the twentieth-century; the literary responses to the mechanized warfare of the First World War; the modern metropolis; media and politics in interwar Berlin; the architectural projects of the Third Reich; and the literature and culture of the divided Germany. The seminar will conclude by examining new possibilities afforded to German speaking cultures with the arrival of cybernetics and the internet. Our readings and viewings will include Benjamin, Brecht, Kittler, Lang, Riefenstahl, Vostell, and others.

 

Horakova

 

M, W 11-12

German 210. Baroque

European Baroque art and German Baroque literature. Revolutions of excess and devolutions of system in architecture, painting, sculpture, poetry, drama, narrative.

Course Note: Readings in German, discussions in English.

Qualified undergraduates welcome

Burgard M 12-2

 

 

German 233. Pathologies of Description: Adalbert Stifter

The seminar focuses on the project of Literary Realism by examining the major literary stories, novellas and novels of Adalbert Stifter, both on the level of form and in relation to broader historical contexts. Topics include: the tension between narrative and description; the relationship between literature and science; Biedermeier culture, politics, and revolution; and the dark side of domestic tranquility. Key selections from the secondary literature complement each session.

Course Note: Readings in German, discussion in English.

Hamilton

F 10-12

German Philology 280.  Approaches to Foreign Language Teaching

 A practical and theoretical introduction to foreign language instruction. Emphasis on historical and current theories of second language acquisition and their implications for the methods of teaching foreign language, culture, and literature

Parkes W 3-5

German 300. Special Reading Programs and Research Problems for Advanced Students

Faculty TBA

TBA

Scandinavian 55. One Hundred Years of Scandinavian Cinema

This course explores Scandinavian cinema from the pioneers of the silent era to the globally successful hit films of the present day. Students will trace the development of Scandinavian cinema through the films of directors such as Viktor Sjöström, Carl Th. Dreyer, Lars von Trier, Ingmar Bergman and Lukas Moodysson and discover the profound influence the region’s films have had, and continue to have, on filmmaking in America and the world.

Conducted in English.

 

Broomé

TBA

Scandinavian 102. Scandinavian 102. Scandinavian Folklore: Trolls, Trolldom and the Uses of Tradition

Examines Nordic folklore and folklife, with an emphasis on narratives, supernatural beliefs, and material culture from the 17th to the early 20th centuries, interpreted against additional sources of information drawn from the archaeological and historical records. Key strategies used in the fields of folklore, literature, and cultural history to interpret such texts discussed in detail, and applied in analyzing our materials. Also carefully considered, the history and development of folklore studies in Scandinavia and the role of folklore (and folklore studies) as, and in, anti-colonial and nation-building movements.

Mitchell

TBA

Scandinavian 300. Special Reading Programs and Research Problems for Advanced Students.

Mitchell

TBA

Swedish Ab. Beginning Swedish Language and Literature

Continuation of the basic course focusing on a basic mastery of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. During spring term, the emphasis is on more advanced conversation and an exploration of Sweden's culture and civilization through selected texts and video. By semester's end, students will be able to carry on conversations in everyday Swedish, read news articles, and write letters and produce substantial creative work.

Broomé

M-Th 9

Swedish Bbr. Special Topics in Swedish Literature and Culture: Women of Letters

In this fourth semester Swedish course, we will explore women’s contribution to Sweden’s literary heritage. The course provides an overview of important historical and contemporary female Swedish writers and works with texts drawn from several centuries and a number of genres. The chronological framework will be complemented by thematic discussions on subjects such as motherhood, sexuality, national and international politics and the city. We will also investigate recent and current Swedish debates on gender, in the news and the wider public discourse.

Broomé

T, Th 11:30-1